How do you find the best lawn care professional for you.

Written by Gene Caballero on September 29, 2014

This lawn mowing season, how did your guy do?

Did he come on the days he said he would?  Did he do a consistent quality job?  If he did, then let him do the lawn again next year, right?   However, if he fell short of your expectations then perhaps its time to find a new lawn care professional.

So what is the best process for going about finding and vetting the best pro to work with.

Starting with a Google search can be overwhelming, as you will get back many many options, and how do you know which ones are good, or even the companies that will want your business.  If you are in need of basic lawn mowing, odds are the companies that pop up on a the first couple pages of a Google search will be larger companies more focuses on commercial projects, and they will not be interested in your basic lawn care.

You can waste a lot of time calling these companies only to find out they are not interested.  However if you run across this issue, ask their receptionist if they have any recommendations for smaller companies looking for new accounts.  Many times these larger companies know the smaller guys that do quality work.  When I ran a large landscape firm, my receptionist always had a list of the smaller eager companies that perform great work, such is the pro that you want to work with

One challenge about finding a great lawn pro is that many vendors come and go each year in the lawn care industry and the good consistent guys are hard to find. They don't have the marketing budget to be found in the typical places where you might be looking for them.  A couple places to find good vendors are Angie's List, Home Adviser, and GreenPal.   If you are feeling a little brave, you also try Craig s List.  Believe it or not there are tons on small lawn care pros that advertise their services there.

Here some questions to ask vendors when interviewing them:

How many lawns are you currently mowing?   It needs to be at least 30 for them to be "in the business"

Do they have any employees? This is important especially if their answer to the first questions is over 50 lawns, they will need help. You don't want the guy that is overwhelmed with current, he wont be able to keep up, and he may make false promises to you with good intentions.

What kind of equipment do they have and where did they purchase it?    If they say Home Depot, or Lowes, this is not your guy.  You want a professional, and you will be able to tell he is a pro by the way he describes his equipment; even if you don't know what he is talking about.

Is this their full time job, or are they a weekend warrior?  Be careful with the part timers, they will get overloaded quickly and will not be able to keep up during the peak times of the season, and you may get skipped some weeks and also service quality may suffer.

How do they expect to get paid?  This is important, as the smaller guys may expect to get aid each week. This can be a total pain coordinating leaving a check or meeting with them to get paid.  You will want a monthly billing statement that shows the date of service.  Would be even better if they take credit cards, but most do not.

Do they service any lawns nearby?   If they have to drive more than about five or ten miles to get to your house, then odds are you will not get satisfactory service. You want the guy with lawns nearby.  If your lawn is a easy stop for him, you will naturally get more constant service.

Be prepared to invest a few hours calling around, leaving messages, and having a few phone conversations to qualify these guys and then request pricing.   You'll be glad you did, you don't want the newbie in the business learning are your lawn.  

Should you want to read reviews about lawn care professionals and hire one online, GreenPal may be able to help you.  We are launched and helping people find lawn care in Atlanta, GA , Nashville TN, and in Florida in St. Petersburg, and Tampa. 

Check out some of GreenPal's other articles

131115 dog eating grass2

The real reason your dog is eating grass

Written by Gene Caballero on August 23, 2017